Natural resources may produce more smog

News AASHTO Journal August 13, 2004
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Even if vehicle and industrial pollutants are held constant, smog and related health problems are likely to increase because of

Even if vehicle and industrial pollutants are held constant, smog and related health problems are likely to increase because of the impacts of climate change and natural elements such as trees, according to new research conducted by scientists at several major universities and released by the Natural Resources Defense Council.


The scientific research showed that as the world's average temperatures rise, trees would release increasingly large amounts of smog-producing chemicals and pollen. Jonathan Patz, an environmental health expert at Johns Hopkins University, told the Wall Street Journal that smog generated by natural resources will "play an important part" in health-related problems.


The report contends that global warming is being triggered by man-made emissions. Scientists predict that by the year 2050 the number of smog-alert days in 15 cities in the U.S. will increase by 60%.


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