INRIX research shows Americans lose 97 hours per year to congestion

The company's 2018 Global Traffic Scorecard indicates traffic backups cost American drivers nearly $87 billion collectively

Traffic Management News February 12, 2019
Printer-friendly version
traffic congestion study

INRIX Inc., the world leader in mobility analytics and connected car services, recently published the company's 2018 Global Traffic Scorecard that identifies and ranks congestion and mobility trends in more than 200 cities across 38 countries.

 

According to INRIX data, Americans lost an average of 97 hours a year due to congestion, costing them nearly $87 billion in 2018, an average of $1,348 per driver.

 

In the U.S., the 2018 Global Traffic Scorecard analyzed congestion and the severity of it in the top 60 urban areas. Boston (164 hours lost due to congestion) and Washington D.C. (155 hours) ranked as the most congested two cities in the U.S., over 15 hours per year more than the next most congested cities, Chicago (138 hours) and Seattle (138 hours). While famous for its congestion, the constant gridlock in Los Angeles (ranked fifth in impact; 128 hours lost in 2018) does not have the severity as the other top-ranked cities due to its sprawling geography and massive road network.

 

Boston drivers lost up to $2,291 per year due to congestion, followed by Washington D.C. ($2,161), Seattle ($1,932), Chicago ($1,920) and New York City ($1,859). Wichita, Kan., had the lowest cost of congestion among the U.S. cities studied at $304 per driver.

 

New York City also was one of the country’s most congested metros, with the ‘last mile’ taking drivers seven minutes. In contrast, Los Angeles (four minutes) has employment across a wider geographic area, preventing severe downtown congestion experienced in more centralized cities.

 

For the fourth year in a row, the Cross Bronx Expressway (I-95) in New York City tops the INRIX list of worst corridors, with drivers wasting a total of 114 hours per year at peak hours in congestion. The list of corridors is dominated by the Top 5 most congested cities in the U.S., accounting for nine of the 10 worst. Surprisingly, Washington D.C., number two in the most congested cities ranking, does not have any corridors that appear on the list. Chicago places second and third place on the list of most congested corridors with I-90/I-94 causing 102 hours of annual delay, while the I-290 Eisenhower Expressway accounts for 93.

 

-----------

Source: INRIX

Overlay Init