ARRA, NAPA team up to track in-place recycling technologies

Contractors encouraged to take confidential survey to track use of in-place recycling technologies

February 25, 2020
ARRA, NAPA team up to track in-place recycling technologies

The National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA) and the Asphalt Recycling & Reclaiming Association (ARRA) are partnering in an effort to measure the use of in-place recycling technologies for asphalt pavements during the 2019 construction season through a survey.

The survey is being conducted under contract with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA).

NAPA and ARRA are encouraging every contractor in the U.S. engaged in hot in-place recycling, cold in-place recycling, cold central plant recycling, and full-depth reclamation of asphalt pavements to participate in the confidential survey. Responses are sought from companies of all sizes and from every community in all 50 U.S. states, as well as all U.S. territories.

"These in-place recycling technologies are an important part of the toolbox, particularly for local agencies," ARRA Executive Director Rick Church said in a statement. "By quantifying the use of these technologies, we can help state and local officials better understand the widespread acceptance of in-place recycling, as well as quantify its sustainable benefits."

Companies using cold in-place, hot in-place, cold central plant recycling, and full-depth reclamation technologies are encouraged to participate in the short survey found here. NAPA and ARRA say all information provided for the survey will be kept confidential, and results will primarily be reported at the national level. Regional results may be reported, if sufficient participation from each region is received to ensure the data remains anonymous.

In-place recycling technologies are a suite of construction techniques and processes used to rehabilitate pavements. They generally involve on-site pulverizing of bound pavement layers, blending an emulsion, foamed asphalt, and/or a recycling agent into the material, and then spreading and compacting it to form a new pavement structure.

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SOURCE: NAPA / ARRA

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