Americans try to deal with congestion

News AASHTO Journal July 16, 2004
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A survey conducted for the Associated Press shows that Americans are adopting a variety of strategies to deal with increasing t

A survey conducted for the Associated Press shows that Americans are adopting a variety of strategies to deal with increasing traffic congestion--but those do not include abandoning their cars for other modes of transportation. The AP survey also showed that about 56% of those surveyed were willing to increase taxation for improved roads and transit if they could feel assurance the funds would be spent on such purposes.


Respondents indicated that in response to congestion they are changing routes, leaving earlier for work and avoiding some roads that have become clogged with traffic. More than half--55%--said traffic near their homes and jobs had gotten worse in the past five years, and three out of 10 said it was much worse.


The poll, conducted by Ipsos-Public Affairs, also showed that 90% of those polled drive themselves to work and nationwide only about one in 20 respondents use mass transit. The proportion rises to one in eight in the east, where more transit is available.


Western drivers were the likeliest to say traffic in their area was getting worse. Two-thirds of respondents from that region expressed the opinion, and half said it was much worse than before.


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