AGC asks OSHA to bend on steel standard

News August 29, 2001
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The Associated General Contractors of America (AGC) is asking OSHA to re-examine a new steel erection standard


The Associated General Contractors of America (AGC) is asking OSHA to re-examine a new steel erection standard.


Claiming workers would be put at undue risk of injury and death unless the rule is changed, the association delivered a letter to Assistant Secretary of Labor John Henshaw outlining four major points OSHA needs to revisit. The areas of concern are: the limits on fall protection for connectors; the provisions on shear connectors; the new definition of an "employer"; and the several inconsistencies in the final rule or with other OSHA standards.


"As the construction industry wrestles with a severe labor shortage, and the risk of injury to its less experienced workers, AGC urges the agency to avoid the many unintended consequences of the final rule. Unless changed, the rule will put workers at an excessive risk of injury."


On July 24, 1997, AGC and other members of the Steel Erection Negotiated Rulemaking Committee signed an agreement not to take action "to inhibit the adoption of the final rule to the extent the final rule and its preamble had the same substance and effect as the Committee Statement."


While the agreement also prohibited AGC from submitting negative comments during the proposed rule, it did not preclude AGC chapters and members from submitting their own comments to OSHA. A number of AGC chapters and members had strong objections to significant portions of the proposed rule.


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